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How to ask for a pay rise

You feel like you’re about to become an old-timer in your position, but your boss doesn’t seem eager to change something and offer you a pay rise? Of course, we all anticipate our management to be a bit more bountiful and voluntarily offer a cherished salary increase. However, do you seek their recognition or actually a better paycheck? If your answer is the latter, this article is your magic wand. The solution is pretty simple – just ask for a pay rise! It might seem bold or even brazen but only at first sight. This article will serve you as a guide on pulling off this stunt and not knocking your boss dead with your unusual request.

Should I ask for a pay rise?

The answer is yes. Once you’ve come up with this question, it means you’ve been working hard enough lately or made a significant contribution to your company’s development. If your boss is trying to avoid the conversation, it’s a good reason to think if it’s worth working for them and this company. You may find a much better job opportunity with a better paycheck initially included instead of feeling awkward and proving your worth to somebody. On the flip side, sometimes it’s not even your boss’s reluctance to praise you. They might be up to their eyes at work and forget to award you. Therefore, it will be absolutely fine to gently remind them of it. No way should you present it as a complaint or a claim – negativity and aggression may be reflected, and you can end up empty-handed. What’s even worse, your relations with the boss might also get affected, which is not what you’re striving for, for sure. So, use the information in the next paragraph and enjoy the great result!

Main steps on how to ask for a pay rise

Many people who are discontent with their salary just keep complaining but do nothing to change it. If you’re reading this article right now, it means you’re not one of them. The good news is that you’re about to see step-by-step instructions on preparing and asking for a raise.

Prepare in advance

The best way to demonstrate to your boss why you deserve a pay rise is to provide factual proof. Keep records of your achievements for the past 6 or 12 months. It makes sense as we may sometimes be involved in numerous working processes, and our accomplishments just slip our minds. Here, your list comes into play. Illustrative will leave a more profound impression on your boss and make them think about the issue.

The right moment matters

The right moment for you and for your company may not coincide. That’s why we do recommend you to be forethoughtful and consider the following factors when getting ready for the conversation X:

  • the financial situation – in no way should your request follow financial losses, cutbacks or massive layoffs in the company;
  • your boss’ workload – in case they’re overwhelmed or stressed out, be sympathetic and offer your help instead of presenting requirements;
  • annual or quarterly performance reviews or the end of a fiscal year would best fire up the conversation.

Be aware of salary trends

Every job has its monetary value. Besides, there are factors such as your workplace’s location, your skills, expertise and contribution to work. You can define the rise’s extent after considering all these factors and comparing the sum with your current salary. Just google the data on salary rates, including national ones, and conclude whether your request is reasonable enough. If your salary falls behind the standard rate, set a meeting safely.

Get ready for any outcome

Even if you’ve shown the list of your recent accomplishments and chosen the right moment to come, the outcome may be unpredictable. Firstly, your boss may still have some clarifying questions. Don’t be squeamish about repeating what has already been saying. Secondly, their answer may be ‘no’ or not now. That should not destabilise you. Instead, it’s your turn to ask clarifying questions about why the raise is not available right now and when exactly it may be available. Suppose the company is really going through a tough period. In that case, you may wonder what perks or benefits could you receive instead of the pay rise. Such things as travel cost coverage or some sports club membership may serve as a good alternative until the raise becomes possible. Be respectful and remember that dialogue is the key to solving any problem.

What is the average UK pay rise?

As we’ve already mentioned, salary rates and pay rises depend on many factors, from personal and professional qualities to age, gender or location issues. The pandemic has also significantly impacted the job market as well as the War in Ukraine. According to the joint release between HMRC and the Office for National Statistics (ONS), median monthly pay has increased by 5.6% in April 2022 compared with April 2021, or by 11.7% when compared with February 2020. What is more interesting is that the annual increase in median pay in April 2022 was the highest in the service activities sector (with a rise of 9.3%) and the lowest in the education sector (with an increase of 2.4%).

Another interesting fact is that according to Reuters, British employers offer annual pay settlements worth an average increase of 2.8% to staff, which is below the inflation rate. And The Chartered Management Institute (CMI) survey revealed that only about half of businesses surveyed between March 31 and April 5 had decided to raise pay in 2022, with 48% either deciding against doing it or feeling unsure.

How to ask for a pay rise
Date: 17 June 2022
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